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Zen and the Art of Prospecting: Working with the Obstacles in Your Path

Selling and prospecting in this day and age is a tough job and it is easy for people who sell to get anxious, discouraged and give up.

Let’s say you are prospecting and sitting at your desk with a new prospect identified to call, and you notice some anxiety, and an urge to go instead to one of your favorite distractions.

And let’s also say you decided to adopt my approach, the Obstacle is the Path.

So the anxiety, and the distraction are your obstacle … but how do you “work with them” as I advised?

First, you don’t run from the obstacle. So instead of seeing the anxiety as something to be avoided (with distraction and procrastination), see it as the place you go to. Same with the fear of failure, the worry that things will go wrong, the cold fear that comes when you think of quitting your job and starting something new. Anxiety isn’t the worst thing in the world and is nothing to be feared. It’s just a feeling, and we can survive it. So sit with it.

Second, you accept the feeling. If it’s anxiety, say, “Cool, I’m feeling some anxiety.” Not, “No! I don’t want to be anxious!” The first actually calms the situation down, and allows you to look at it like an observer. The second makes the situation worse and makes you see the situation as a scared child.

Third, you look at the cause. What is causing your anxiety? Is the prospecting really such a bad thing? No, actually, it’s not that hard. It’s simply taking the time to do your research, thinking about the value you will bring to your prospect, putting them down in writing, and picking up the phone. The prospecting itself isn’t giving you the anxiety — it’s the fantasy you have of wanting to say something excellent that people will think is good and judge you as competent and smart. The anxiety comes from the worry that you will fail at this and people will instead judge you as dumb. This fantasy, which isn’t real, is the source of your anxiety.

Fourth, you see that it’s hurting you. You can’t let go of this fantasy, because you want it so much. But take a moment to see its effects — it is hurting you. It is causing you suffering. It’s causing you to not do the things you want to do. Be honest about its effects — the fantasy isn’t helping, and is definitely hurting.

Fifth, let it go out of compassion. If you’re hurting yourself, and not helping, with this fantasy — why hold onto it? What’s so great about it? It’s not real. It’s totally manufactured in your mind. Instead, be compassionate with yourself, and let go of the fantasy. When you let go of this thing you’ve been holding onto, you can feel a sense of relief.

Sixth, then go through the obstacle and be mindful. The obstacle was anxiety. It lessens once you let go of the fantasy. You can now get to prospecting, and once you do, without fantasies, you can see that it’s not that bad. In fact, if you are mindful in your activity, you can see that it’s kinda alright. Better than that perhaps — kinda great. And you almost missed out on it because of your obstacle.

The Path to Zen Prospecting

If you go through these six little steps, which aren’t that difficult each step along the way, you’ll not only be able to do the writing (or quit your job or start a new project or have a difficult conversation) … you’ll be better at dealing with similar obstacles in the future. You’ll be stronger, smarter, less afraid.

This is why you should work with the obstacles instead of avoiding them — you learn from them.

This article was adapted from a post by Leo Babauta on his website www.zenhabits.net

About the Author

Richardson is a global sales training and performance improvement company. Our goal is to transform every buyer experience by empowering sellers with critical skills so they can create value to buyers and drive meaningful conversations. Our methodology combines a market proven sales and coaching curriculum with an innovative and customizable approach to learning that ensures your sales teams learn, master, and apply those behaviors where and when it matters most — in front of your customers. It’s our job to anticipate change in your industry so that your sales team can focus on fostering long-term relationships, becoming indispensable partners for their buyers.

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